Segment 112

Space Coast Ecology, California Condors, Green Roofs

State(s) featured in this episode: California/Florida/Georgia/New York

While shuttle missions are no longer taking off from the Kennedy Space Center, scientists are still making discoveries at central Florida’s Space Coast: the Merritt Island Wildlife Refuge is a rich ecosystem. Protecting the upper Rio Grande is important for both Hispanic and Native American culture. Recovering from near extinction, California condors now face poisoning by lead bullets as wildlife authorities educate hunters about alternative ammunition. Urban “heat islands” are taking some clues from Mother Nature: green roofs in big cities are helping cool things off, recycle water, and offer a resting place for birds and butterflies.

More Information

Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge
California Condors
Georgia Bats
Southeast Bat Diversity Network
Rail Runner Express
Green Roofs 

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State(s) featured in this episode: Florida / Mississippi / Texas
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